Self-fulfilling prophecy – how our perceptions can influence reality

Why will some people succeed while others fail? If you have ever participated in a team sport as a youngster you might recall that some players always got to play more than others. These players where often those with the best skills and therefore the coaches preferred them over other less skilled players. As a result, these players would become better and the others had to work harder and often failed to improve in order to catch a spot on the team. This effect could be caused by something called the self-fulfilling prophecy.

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“He did it because..,but I did it because..” How attribution theory impact on how you percieve others.

How do you explain someone actions and how do you explain your own actions? If you give it some thought you might acknowledge that how you explain them are very different. For example, someone is late to work because they are lazy or because something happened on the way to work? How you understand your and others actions will alter how people are perceived.

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Are you a florist? Why “water” is an essential element to your employees motivation.

A florist needs to care for his or her plants to make a living. Think of flowers as a florists employees. You yourself most likely have flowers, if not at home you might have it at your workplace. Having flowers that don’t dry up requires you to give them nutrition, and not forgetting it e.g. assign a bad system of care for your plants.

This famous quote from the author of the 7 habits of highly effective people sums it up:

“If you put good people in bad systems you get bad results. You have to water the flowers you want to grow.” — Stephen Covey

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This sums up the point I was trying to make in my last post. Very good article which emphasizes the value of empowering your employees.

Leading with Trust

I would like to propose a workplace version of the Miranda Warning. You’re probably familiar with it, but if not, it’s the warning given by police officers in the United States to criminal suspects before they take them into custody and question them. The Miranda Warning (aka, Miranda Rights) goes like this:

“You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can and will be held against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you. Do you understand these rights as they have been read to you?”

My workplace version of the Miranda Warning is to protect employees’ rights to make their own decisions and to remind over-controlling leaders to back off, quit grabbing control (because you think your way is the best and only way), and…

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